August 2012

Red Power Round Up Was Unveiling of New RFD Show

Red Power Round Up Was Unveiling of New RFD Show

I first met Rodney Miller at the Half Century of Progress, a couple of shows ago. He was then the CEO of McCormick tractor and was proud as punch of the newly restored 1978IH 1086 tractor that had recently been restored. This tractor is very important to Rodney because it belonged to his father, Gene Miller. Rodney was kind enough to share the story of growing up on a farm in Benton, Illinois and the important values his father instilled in him.

At the Red Power Round Up, I ran into Rodney again and learned that he is collecting stories that celebrate life in rural America. His new show is called Small Town Big Deat and will air September 6th. The show will run at 9:30 Eastern and 8:30 Central time on Thursday nights.

This interests me because this is what rural living is all about, the people and places that make up the Prairie where we sow our seeds and harvest our crops. The rusty iron that lies out back all have a story along with the hunched over farmer that drove it and the farmwife that brought a meal to the field and sat by her husband/father/brothers side. The men and women that make up the Midwest are heros in my book and it is an honor to see them profiled as such!

Women on a mission, visited Adams Mill

Women on a mission, visited Adams Mill

It was hot, it was dusty and we wanted to see some sights. Five women at this year’s Graham Bradley show including me wanted to play tourist and see some of the local sights while in the Lafayette, Indiana area.

One sight that was on my list was the Adams Mill which was built by John Adams who selected his site when he walked along the Wildcat Creek from Lafayette toward what would become the site of Kokomo. Choosing the oxbow bend in the creek, Adams built a turbine powered the mill that manufactured flour until 1953.

Inside the mill is also an Americana Museum. The mill is built in the traditional post and beam construction built from local hand hewn lumber. There is nothing much more impressive that beams of lumber and a three story structure without a single nail.

Awed, we walked through as much as we could stand heat wise and enjoyed Al Auffart’s wonderful tour. If in the area take the time to check out this historic site that sits like a sentinel along the Wildcat Creek outside of Cutler, Indiana.. Call 765-268-2530 or log onto www.adams-mill.org for details

Downtown Chicago Farmer's Market

Downtown Chicago Farmer's Market

Downtown Chicago has many sites to offer, this farmer’s market was a bit of unexpected rural flvory in the heart of the city.

This market was at Federal Plaza Market was located at the corner of Adams & Dearborn. The Market iis open every Tuesday until the end of October.

The Windy City offers culture, architecture, the Chicago River, plays, restaurants and fresh eating to boot! While you won’t drive your pick up truck and park at the street corner you could load up your basket with fresh offerings and have a picnic in a green space and enjoy the last hustle and bustle of summer before the wind howls around city corners and the snow flies!

New York's Central Park

New York's Central Park

Did you know that Central Park was one of the first public places created and that the park is a manmade creation designed by landscape architect Frederick Olmsted ?

This park has been around for a while, design on the the park was actually stopped during the Civil War, then resumed after the war and and completed in 1873.

The park happened to be a very popular place for professional photography. My daughter and I were visiting the beautiful city in July and we stopped at Central Park on our last day. We saw a model garbed in a wedding tux looking like he was ready to say “I do” and a young woman being filmed walking in a famous area under a lovely bridge.

On our walk to and at the park we witnessed at a commercial where they actually topped traffic in both directions.

Central Park was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962. While we enjoyed walking around the best part of our visit to the park was a tour as we sat in a rickshaw pulled by a bicycle, our guide, a transplanted Irishman shared the history of the city and pointed out all the important sites. He pointed out the fountain where the Friends cast cavorted in the opening. He pointed out important statues and historic sites and even the building where John Lennon was shot. The tour added insight that we would not have had and provided us the time to see sights we would not have seen without his tour. It was fun to hear about American history from a lilting Irish accent. New York was and is a true melting pot. We were honored to be one of the masses! .

The Darst International Harvester Musseum

The Darst International Harvester Musseum

Darrell and Kevin Darst have an amazing International Harvester museum in Madison, Missouri. Darrell is the editor of the International Harvester club publication Harvester Highlights and he and his wife Kevin have been collecting for decades. Kevin is the queen of IH refrigeration and freezer collectibles and their museum reflects their knowledge and the love they have for what was once the largest farm machinery company in the country.

The Darst Collection includes many rare and unique items like pictures, signs and even equipment. Keith and I visited this August and enjoyed the Darst collection and hospitality. Everyone will walk away with something that is their favorite item, I think mine may have been the film where an IH spokesperson is telling dealers how to sell the refrigerators and talking about the new “Spring green” color.

T schedule a visit you need to call ahead at 660-291-8742.